How Can the Camera Show Love? Cinematographer James Laxton on Shooting If Beale Street Could Talk

Cinematographer James Laxton’s latest project, If Beale Street Could Talk, marks a further step in his collaboration with director Barry Jenkins. Based on the novel by James Baldwin, it follows a troubled romance between Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James) in the New York City of the early 1970s. If Beale Street Could Talk screened at the closing night celebration at the recent Cameraimage Festival, where Laxton had a packed schedule. He participated in a two-part panel,”The Language of Cinema Is Image,” conducted a four-hour Arri Master Class on large-format digital capture, presented a Creative Light Experts roundtable, and […]
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How Can the Camera Show Love? Cinematographer James Laxton on Shooting If Beale Street Could Talk

Cinematographer James Laxton’s latest project, If Beale Street Could Talk, marks a further step in his collaboration with director Barry Jenkins. Based on the novel by James Baldwin, it follows a troubled romance between Tish (KiKi Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James) in the New York City of the early 1970s. If Beale Street Could Talk screened at the closing night celebration at the recent Cameraimage Festival, where Laxton had a packed schedule. He participated in a two-part panel,”The Language of Cinema Is Image,” conducted a four-hour Arri Master Class on large-format digital capture, presented a Creative Light Experts roundtable, and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Review: Another Cinematic Wonder from Barry Jenkins

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Review: Another Cinematic Wonder from Barry Jenkins
Moonlight director Barry Jenkins returns with If Beale Street Could Talk, an adaptation of the novel by James Baldwin. Romantic and tragic, Beale Street is gorgeous and emotionally stirring – the type of movie that only comes along every so often. “Love brought you here. If you trusted love this far, don’t panic now. Trust it all […]

The post ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Review: Another Cinematic Wonder from Barry Jenkins appeared first on /Film.
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‘If Beale Street Could Talk’s’ Barry Jenkins On The ‘Amazing’ Regina King And Honoring James Baldwin’s Legacy [Interview]

If there is anything slightly disappointing this awards season so far its the fact critics groups seem to be taking Barry Jenkins’ directorial talents for granted. He’s already won an Oscar for his “Moonlight” screenplay and his sophomore film electrified the world by winning Best Picture, but you’d almost think his critically acclaimed follow-up, “If Beale Street Could Talk,” directed itself. Not that Jenkins seems to care. His priorities always seem to be supporting his cinematic collaborators whether they be in front of or behind the camera.

Continue reading ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’s’ Barry Jenkins On The ‘Amazing’ Regina King And Honoring James Baldwin’s Legacy [Interview] at The Playlist.
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Review: If Beale Street Could Talk, The Cost of Love

Perhaps it is true what is said, that the world looks different when you’re in love. Colours are fuller and brighter; even a dingy basement apartment can seem like a palace; and you have all the hope that, no matter what obstacles the world might throw at you, you and the person you love can overcome anything. And perhaps no other filmmaker working today gives us a richer vision of love, and the cost of love, than Barry Jenkins. In his latest feature film, If Beale Street Could Talk, Jenkins explores the love between two young people, a love grown out of childhood and youth, a love as rich as we all wish to have. And yet, because they are black and this is the...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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In Theaters This Weekend: Reviews of 'Mortal Engines,' 'Spider-Verse,' 'The Mule' and More

In Theaters This Weekend: Reviews of 'Mortal Engines,' 'Spider-Verse,' 'The Mule' and More
This Friday, theatergoers can step into a multi-dimensional Spider-Verse or a dystopian world ruled by moving cities.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and Mortal Engines will both hit theaters this weekend. They join Clint Eastwood's latest film, The Mule, which features the 88-year-old actor playing a drug courier.

Limited releases include Barry Jenkins' follow-up to Moonlight, If Beale Street Could Talk, as well as Lebanese drama Capharnaum.

Read on to see what critics for The Hollywood Reporter had to say about this weekend's offerings.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Barry Jenkins cements himself as an essential voice with “If Beale Street Could Talk”

From the moment anyone in the industry saw Moonlight, it was clear that Barry Jenkins was going to be a force in Hollywood. Before it had Oscar buzz, before it was an awards season darling, and before it made Jenkins an Academy Award winner (not to mention before it took home Best Picture), it was just a phenomenal movie that heralded a filmmaker who had found an essential voice. Now, with Jenkins’ latest hitting screens in If Beale Street Could Talk, that voice has been unleashed again. A one of a kind writer and director, Jenkins is having a conversation with his audience that few other creative forces in the industry are having. The film, adapted from the James Baldwin novel of the same name, is a drama, while also a romance, and at the same time a look at the criminal justice system. Tish Rivers (KiKi Layne) is a
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Why Annapurna Needs ‘Beale Street’ and ‘Vice’ to Score With Audiences as Well as Awards Voters

  • The Wrap
Why Annapurna Needs ‘Beale Street’ and ‘Vice’ to Score With Audiences as Well as Awards Voters
As Annapurna’s second year in the movie distribution business comes to an end, the studio is looking for a serious box office hit to help plant its flag in the indie box office scene. To this end, they are turning to two films made by recent Oscar-nominated directors: Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Adam McKay’s “Vice.”

“Beale Street,” which opens Friday in New York and Los Angeles and goes wide the weekend before Oscar nominations are announced, has long been expected to be an awards contender — and awards buzz usually translates to better box office results. Based on James Baldwin’s classic book and made by Jenkins with much of the team that helped him make his Best Picture-winning “Moonlight,” the film earned critical acclaim after its Toronto premiere, made the National Board of Review and AFI top 10 lists and earned three Golden Globe nominations last week.
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Review: If Beale Street Could Talk

by Murtada Elfadl

If Beale Street Could Talk starts with Fonny (Stephan James) asking his girlfriend Tish (Kiki Layne) “Are you ready for this?” I have been ready for a James Baldwin film adaptation for many years. Since I read "Giovanni’s Room" as a young teen and my mind was opened to queer stories. Since I was given "The Fire Next Time" to read as I made the decision to immigrate to the United States, so that I know what I was getting myself into. "Another Country" remains my favorite novel of all time. I am biased for Baldwin, for his writing, for his ideas, for his power, so I was excited for this film. I was also afraid. Will Barry Jenkins be able to interpret Baldwin’s howls of anger and despair as loud as I heard them reading Baldwin’s prose? I needn’t have worried.

Set in early-1970s Harlem,
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Oscars 2019: Best Editing Predictions

Oscars 2019: Best Editing Predictions
This award season the best editing navigated complex mood swings in capturing love and pain in such Oscar contenders as “Roma,” “A Star Is Born,” “The Favourite,” “First Man,” “If Beale Street Could Talk,” “Green Book,” and “Widows.”

Several movies started off strong with the bold opening, including the mopping of water in the credit scene in “Roma,” the perilous X-15 flight in “First Man,” and the juxtaposition of Viola Davis in bed with Liam Neeson with the botched heist in “Widows.”

Roma,” Alfonso Cuarón’s black-and-white childhood remembrance of things past, establishes a rhythm as well as a cleansing metaphor about life and memory with the flow of water in the opening. Cuarón, who served as editor with co-editor Adam Gough, created a dance with his pacing, making the viewer a voyeur in a family drama filled with daily adventures that ebb and flow in intensity.

The director meticulously
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Barry Jenkins Back With ‘Beale Street’; Lars Von Trier Has ‘House That Jack Built’ – Specialty B.O. Preview

Barry Jenkins Back With ‘Beale Street’; Lars Von Trier Has ‘House That Jack Built’ – Specialty B.O. Preview
Annapurna’s If Beale Street Could Talk from writer-director Barry Jenkins is among the headlining Specialty rollouts this weekend. Beale Street is the first title to come from Annapurna’s three-year production deal with Plan B Entertainment. The film will have a somewhat slow rollout before going wide later next month. IFC Films is going out day and date with Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier’s Cannes premiere The House That Jack Built, starring Matt Dillon. The film had select directors-cut showings one day last month, which resulted in an MPAA dressing-down. And Sony Pictures Classics is opening fellow Cannes premiere, Capernaum, which is Lebanon’s foreign-language Oscar entry. Spc is touting the performances of its young cast as among the “best ever” for child leads.

If Beale Street Could Talk

Director-writer: Barry Jenkins

Cast: KiKi Layne, Stephan James, Colman Domingo, Teyonah Parris, Michael Beach, Aunjanue Ellis, Dave Franco, Diego Luna,
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“What Moonlight Gave Us Was the Confidence to Execute Our Ideas Without Fear”: Writer/Director Barry Jenkins on If Beale Street Could Talk

Writer-director Barry Jenkins solidifies his position as one of the current cinema’s most empathetic and visually (and aurally) expressive filmmakers with his third feature, If Beale Street Could Talk. Adapted from a 1974 novel by James Baldwin, the film tells the story of Tish and Fonny, a young couple whose dreams are cut short by Fonny’s wrongful imprisonment; moving back and forth between the early days of their love story and the brutal reality of their present, Jenkins crafts a masterpiece that is simultaneously achingly, hopefully romantic and unblinking in its portrait of social injustice. While Moonlight drew upon cinematic […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

“What Moonlight Gave Us Was the Confidence to Execute Our Ideas Without Fear”: Writer/Director Barry Jenkins on If Beale Street Could Talk

Writer-director Barry Jenkins solidifies his position as one of the current cinema’s most empathetic and visually (and aurally) expressive filmmakers with his third feature, If Beale Street Could Talk. Adapted from a 1974 novel by James Baldwin, the film tells the story of Tish and Fonny, a young couple whose dreams are cut short by Fonny’s wrongful imprisonment; moving back and forth between the early days of their love story and the brutal reality of their present, Jenkins crafts a masterpiece that is simultaneously achingly, hopefully romantic and unblinking in its portrait of social injustice. While Moonlight drew upon cinematic […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Film Review: Barry Jenkins Grapples With James Baldwin’s Prose in Powerful Drama

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Film Review: Barry Jenkins Grapples With James Baldwin’s Prose in Powerful Drama
Faith in a very pure romantic attraction between two people was the dramatic core of Barry Jenkins’ Oscar-winning “Moonlight,” and that same faith is the animating principle of his much-anticipated follow-up, “If Beale Street Could Talk,” a rich but very unwieldy adaptation of James Baldwin’s 1974 novel.

Moonlight” originated in a story from the gifted playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney, and Jenkins was able to make the narrative of that sensitive film his own by applying a poetic kind of stealth to the subjective visuals. But Baldwin’s “If Beale Street Could Talk” makes for a much more demanding and intimidating authorial basis for a movie.

Tish Rivers (KiKi Layne) and Fonny Hunt have known each other since they were children. Jenkins’ film, like Baldwin’s novel, is told from Tish’s point of view and moves backward and forward in time in a way that suggests puzzle pieces scattered out on a table.
See full article at The Wrap »

CAA Signs ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ & ‘Homecoming’ Star Stephan James

CAA Signs ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ & ‘Homecoming’ Star Stephan James
Exclusive: Breakout actor Stephan James has just signed with CAA. James is currently starring in the Barry Jenkins-directed If Beale Street Could Talk, playing Alonzo “Fonny” Hunt, the young man whose incarceration for a crime he didn’t commit propels the narrative. He also stars in Sam Esmail’s Amazon Prime Video series Homecoming, and last week received a Golden Globe nomination for his performance opposite Julia Roberts. Beale Street has been nominated for three Golden Globes including Best Motion Picture — Drama.

James got that role after starring as 1936 Olympic gold medalist sprinter Jesse James in Race, and his past turns include Selma, the TV series Shots Fired, and first gaining notice for the teen series Degrassi: The Next Generation. He is next booked to star in the Stx action-thriller 17 Bridges.

I met James recently at Deadline’s New York Contenders event, and it was easy to walk away saying,
See full article at Deadline »

Stephen James Discusses Deep Love Behind ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’

Stephan James’ year has been a creatively gratifying one, as he received great notices for his work in the Amazon Prime Video series Homecoming and filmmaker Barry Jenkins’ (Moonlight) latest film If Beale Street Could Talk. Based on the James Baldwin novel, If Beale Street Could Talk is a 1970s, Harlem set story about Tish [...]

The post Stephen James Discusses Deep Love Behind ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ appeared first on Hollywood Outbreak.
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How Barry Jenkins shows that more is less in Beale Street

In his follow-up to best picture winner Moonlight, the director’s mixed adaptation of a James Baldwin classic boasts lush visuals but a flawed script

From a lush opening shot designed to astound to costume choices that aim for awe, Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk, his much-anticipated follow-up to game-changing best picture winner Moonlight, shows a world suffused with glamour.

At its best, the director’s adaptation of James Baldwin’s 70s-set Harlem romance recalls the work of Wong Kar Wai (a film-maker Jenkins has often referenced) with its unbroken shots of hands touching and gazing lovers set to crackly soul records. It’s an inarguably impressive piece of film-making but technique and style only go so far and unlike in his previous, superior work, he’s never quite able to dip beneath the glassy surface.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Director Barry Jenkins on Why Showing Vulnerability Is ‘a Sign of Strength’

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Director Barry Jenkins on Why Showing Vulnerability Is ‘a Sign of Strength’
This story about Barry Jenkins and “If Beale Street Could Talk” star KiKi Layne first appeared in Actors/Directors/Screenwriters issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

Barry Jenkins wrote and directed one of the most beautiful films of 2016 in “Moonlight,” which won him the Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay, and won breakout star Mahershala Ali an Oscar as well.

Two years later, with another virtually unknown actor ready for her star turn, he is back with “If Beale Street Could Talk,” an adaptation of James Baldwin’s critically acclaimed novel of the same name. He wrote the screenplay before he even had the rights to the film, and cast Chicago theater veteran KiKi Layne as a young woman whose soulmate and fiancé Fonny is arrested for a crime he didn’t commit.

Why this project, and why now?

Barry Jenkins: The now part of it
See full article at The Wrap »

A world of intensity by Anne-Katrin Titze

Luke Davies on dinner with Heath Ledger and Philip Seymour Hoffman: "At the Candy première at Berlin. The film Capote was also there." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Luke Davies, in town for a Writers Guild of America East panel, joined me at the Park Lane Hotel on Central Park South for a follow-up conversation on Beautiful Boy that took us to a dinner he attended in Berlin for Bennett Miller's Capote with Philip Seymour Hoffman and Neil Armfield's Candy star Heath Ledger, and onto Anton Corbijn's A Most Wanted Man and Life.

Felix van Groeningen's Beautiful Boy, co-written with Luke Davies is based on the memoirs by David Sheff (Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction) and by his son Nic Sheff (Tweak). The film stars Timothée Chalamet, Steve Carell, Maura Tierney, and Amy Ryan, and is produced by two-time Oscar-winners Dede Gardner and
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

How Barry Jenkins Planted The Seed For Adapting ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Long Before ‘Moonlight’ Oscar Victory

How Barry Jenkins Planted The Seed For Adapting ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Long Before ‘Moonlight’ Oscar Victory
“Love cannot be taken from your heart,” says Barry Jenkins. “Love is too important.”

It is a lesson the director of Medicine for Melancholy and Moonlight—both films about love’s survival in spite of challenging circumstances—has finally learned. “You’ve made me sound like a f*cking romantic,” he told me two years ago, when we discussed Moonlight. “And I’m a craftsman. I am a craftsman, I am a craftsman.” he declared.

“That’s out the window with this film,” he reluctantly admits now, of his new project If Beale Street Could Talk. “Oh man, is that out the window.”

It’s easy to understand why he might have fooled himself out of a romantic response to his own work. Melancholy dealt with a rare connection between two people in a city in which minorities are firmly in the minority. Moonlight dealt with a young boy tortured
See full article at Deadline »
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